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Rosalind's Classroom Conversations

About Rosalind's Classroom Conversations

Rosalind Wiseman
Rosalind Wiseman

Check Rosalind's Classroom Conversations each month for the latest installment. Read the current issue: 'Politically Correct,' For Whom?

Each month Rosalind Wiseman, best selling book author and bullying prevention specialist, will join forces with ADL to provide this timely resource for educators. Rosalind’s Classroom Conversations includes features on bullying, current events and the social and emotional development of children.

Rosalind Wiseman is a teacher, thought leader, author and media spokesperson on bullying prevention, ethical leadership, the use of social media and media literacy. She is the author of Queen Bees and Wannabes: Helping Your Daughter Survive Cliques, Gossip, Boyfriends, and the New Realities of Girl World—the groundbreaking, best-selling book that was the basis for the movie Mean Girls. Her latest books, Masterminds & Wingmen: Helping Our Boys Cope with Schoolyard Power, Locker-Room Tests, Girlfriends, and the New Rules of Boy World was published in September 2013. She also writes the monthly “Ask Rosalind” column in Family Circle magazine, and is a regular contributor to several blogs and websites.

Current issue: 'Politically Correct,' For Whom?

Past Essays

Elementary School Students Group Standing
iStock

Welcome to High School: We Hate You, August 2015

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Do No Harm: How to Intervene Without Making It Worse, June/July 2015

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Obedience, Pledges and the Real Work of Building Credibility

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Girls Got Game, Discussing Video Games and Stereotypes in the Classroom, April 2015

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Online Behavior: We're Just As Bad As We Say Teens Are, March 2015

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The Power of Gossip, January 2015

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Making It Meaningful: Interrupting Biased Comments in the Classroom, November/December 2014

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Are Boys Really That Easy? October 2014

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The Unspoken Messages of Dress Codes: Uncovering Bias and Power, September 2014

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League of Lessons: Why Gaming Matters, July/August 2014

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The Power of Real Apologies in a Fake Apology World, June 2014

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Every Conflict Isn't Bullying, May 2014

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'Politically Correct,' For Whom?, April 2016 Issue

Teacher Lesson High School Class
iStock

When I first started teaching high school students, the term “politically correct” routinely came up. Especially when I covered sexual harassment, it was not uncommon for a male student to declare that he had the right to make offensive statements because the constitution protected his free speech. Further, he would proclaim that anyone who disagreed with him wasn’t worthy of his respect because they were being “politically correct.” 

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Stop Tearing Your Hair Out: What To Do When Bullying Interventions Don’t Work, September 2015 Issue

Student in Class Being Bullied
Bigstock

The question I’m tackling this month is what to do when bullying interventions don’t work. As in you’ve tried everything and the aggressors are still being mean or bullying the target.

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It’s Not a Transaction—It’s a Relationship, December 2015 Issue

Male High School Student Talking to Teacher by Lockers
iStock

Lately I’ve been thinking about the impact of the small, fleeting moments that happen between students and teachers countless times a day. It can be in the hallway, right before or after class, walking between buildings and in the cafeteria.

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Jokes, Excuses and Why Words Matter, January 2016 Issue

Teenage Students Class Debate
iStock

Words matter. Our words can comfort and express that we understand or that we “see” the other person in front of us. And of course, our words can do the opposite: they can hurt, isolate and make someone feel insignificant.

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Beyond Blaming and Shaming: How To Learn from Our Digital Mistakes, February 2016 Issue

student on white
Bigstock

What would high school be without photographs? Smiling couples at the homecoming dance, athletes racing down fields to win games, actors performing in the spring play. It’s ironic that as much as people describe the awkwardness, drama and sometimes misery of high school, the official school pictures only show the best and happiest of moments. 

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