ADL Announces Fellowship Focused on Expanding Awareness of Bias Faced By Jews of Color

New York, NY, November 5, 2021… In an effort to raise awareness of the various forms of oppression faced by Jews with multiple marginalized identities, ADL (the Anti-Defamation League) today announced the creation of a new fellowship focused on expanding awareness of the impact of antisemitism and racism on Jews of Color in the United States. 

The ADL Collaborative for Change is currently seeking project applications from individuals who have shown a dedicated commitment to working to counter bias and hate targeted at Jews and other groups, and who have a deep understanding of biases faced by Jews of Color. 

“We hope these projects will center and amplify the perspectives of diverse Jews who experience antisemitism and other forms of bias to better inform the work that needs to happen both inside and outside the Jewish community,” said Carly Pildis, ADL’s Associate Director of Community Engagement, a member of the ADL team spearheading the fellowship initiative. “By bringing greater awareness and exposure of these forms of biases, we hope our fellows will help move the needle in the battle against the prejudices faced by Jews of Color.” 

The fellows whose projects are chosen will be able to request an amount of up to $25,000 to help fund their project and will have access to ADL’s team of national experts on antisemitism and bias. Activities could range from multimedia projects to producing educational materials, advertising campaigns, academic research and more.  

Prospective Fellows can apply by submitting a 1–2 page project proposal/statement of intent or short video outlining the proposed project, resume and a brief budget to fellowship@adl.org. Applications to the Fellowship are due December 1, 2021. Successful applicants will be notified in mid-December. 

Proposals will be reviewed by ADL staff in addition to a panel of external reviewers, which includes Bianca González-Lesser, a DEI expert focusing on Jewish nonprofits; Kendell Pinkney, a Brooklyn-based artistic director, creative producer and rabbinical student; Rabbi Isaiah Joseph Rothstein, Rabbinic Scholar and Public Affairs Advisor at Jewish Federations of North America (JFNA); and Devyani Saltzman, a Canadian writer, curator and arts leader. 

The fellowship will be formally announced on Monday Nov. 8 during ADL’s Never Is Now virtual summit during a panel discussion on “Confronting Anti-Black Racism to Fight Antisemitism” moderated by Tema Smith, project consultant for the fellowship and a contributing columnist at the Forward; and also featuring Yolanda Savage-Narva, Director of Racial Equity, Diversity and Inclusion at the Union for Reform Judaism, Eric K. Ward, Executive Director of the Western States Center and Chava Shervington, Founder of Kamochah and board member of the Jewish Multiracial Network. 

ADL is the world’s leading anti-hate organization. Founded in 1913 in response to an escalating climate of antisemitism and bigotry, its timeless mission is to protect the Jewish people and to secure justice and fair treatment for all. Today, ADL continues to fight all forms of hate with the same vigor and passion. A global leader in exposing extremism, delivering anti-bias education, and fighting hate online, ADL is the first call when acts of antisemitism occur. ADL’s ultimate goal is a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate.